‘Every cloud has a silver lining.’ (Idioms with weather words, Part 2)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog


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by Kate Woodford

This is the second of three blog posts on idioms that contain words relating to the weather. Previously, we focused on idioms with stormy words. Today, we’re looking at idioms containing a wider range of weather – sun, rain and clouds.

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‘Cooking up a storm’ and ‘faces like thunder’ (Idioms with weather words, Part 1)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog


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by Kate Woodford

It may not surprise you to hear that the weather features in a lot of English idioms. In many of these, the weather words are used metaphorically, in a way that makes the meaning quite obvious. For example, a storm often features in idioms as something negative, referring to a period of trouble, and a cloud is something that spoils a situation. This post will focus on idioms related to storms, of which there are many!

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Blood is thicker than water. (Idioms with ‘water’, Part 2)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog


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by Kate Woodford

This is the second of two posts on idioms that contain the word ‘water’. On this blog, we always try to provide you with commonly used, contemporary idioms and this post is no exception!

If you say you will do somethingcome hell or high water, you mean you are very determined to do it, whatever difficulties you may face: I’m going to be at that ceremony next year, come hell or high water!

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